News

Little Known Facts About Scottish Clans January 30, 2016 17:21

Over the centuries a great many myths surrounding Scottish clans have arisen, due in no small part to the "Romantic-Revival" of Scottish culture that began with the publication of James MacPherson's Ossian, less than two decades after the clans were defeated in the last Jacobite uprising in 1746. Although reduced to a mainly ceremonial status, Scottish nostalgia and sentiment for the clans fueled a continuing interest which had led to the development of many customs and traditions that have since become an integral part of our Scottish cultural heritage. Although it is often wrongly assumed that these customs developed naturally over the course of many centuries, many of them originated in the first decades of the 19th century while others first came to light during the Victorian era that followed shortly thereafter. Read more >>

 

 

 


Scottish Games & Festivals 2016 Schedule January 27, 2016 17:13

The Scottish Games & Festivals Schedule has been posted. Games & Festivals are listed by State and not in chronological order. Please check the Festivals website before attending. Times, Dates and Locations were accurate at the time of this posting as per the organizations website.

Use this link to get to the Scottish Games & Festivals 2016 Schedule>>

First up: January 29 - 30, 2016 Sarasota Highland Games and Celtic Festival – www.sarasotahighlandgames.com Sarasota County Fair Grounds, Sarasota, FL

 

 


Clansmen - Saor Patrol - Pipes & Drums August 18, 2015 18:13

The Pipes & Drums have always played in my heart and soul.

Alba Gu Bràth!


"Quality" Is The Only Word You Need To Know August 03, 2015 09:21

My wife came home yesterday and said that one of the stores she visited is carrying one of our well-known competitor's kilt line. I have wondered for a while what materials our competitors kilts were made from and what kind of quality to expect for the high dollar pricing. You go to their website and they don't tell you what their kilts are made of or how they are made, let alone where they are made.

So today I had my wife take me by the store so I could get a look, AND I must say if you aren't buying an Angry Bastard Kilt and you are getting them from our competitors, you are being ripped off.

The well-known competitors utility kilt:

  1. Cotton/Polyester Blend: Very light fabric has the durability of a handkerchief. The kind your grandma used to wipe your nose with as a kid. A slight wind or a sneeze would reveal your manly bits
  2. Limited sizes:  not a manly size in the bunch
  3. Looked more like a woman's mini-skirt than a man's utility kilt
  4. The front apron was little more than two pleats wide and there was no under apron
  5. Way overpriced for the shabby quality of the material
  6. Not made in the U.S.A

Angry Bastard Kilts:

  1. Heavy-Duty Cotton Duck:
    -100% Cotton 10 oz Duck Cloth on the Starter Kilt. Light weight, but heavy duty, thick material. Durable and water resistant.
    -100% Cotton #10-15 oz Duck Cloth on the Basic and Deluxe Kilts. With a tighter weave, which makes them more durable, tear and water resistant. A heavier material, yet very comfortable and cool.
  2. Limitless Sizing Options: Sizes range from 28 - 50 waist in Men's sizes. Lengths from 22 - 30 inches. So no matter if you are short and fat or tall and thin, we can fit almost anyone into an Angry Bastard Kilt. We also make sizes larger than 50, so if you need something a little more custom, we can build it for you.
  3. Angry Bastard Kilts won't get mistaken for a women's skirt. These kilts are heavy duty in every sense of the word. They are made for outdoor activity and made to take the punishment you put them through.
  4. The Starter Kilt has Sewn-in Knife Pleats. The Basic and Deluxe Kilts have Sewn-in Box Pleats, meaning the pleats will stay in after washing.
  5. Overlapping Front and Under Aprons means plenty of heft where you need it. If you are working construction, you need a material that will stand up to the rigors of your trade. Our heavy-duty duck cloth wears better than your best pair of jeans and are tear and water resistant. Guaranteed.
  6. The old adage "you get what you pay for" applies to our kilts. Made of the best materials with the hard working man or woman in mind, we don't take short cuts or use substandard materials. Only the best goes into an Angry Bastard Kilt.
  7. Best of all, Angry Bastard Kilts are made in the U.S.A. Not China, not Pakistan, not some third world country where kids and women work 20 hour days in a locked, hot sweatshop. Right here in America. Each kilt is hand made to your specifications, and we take your kilt from the cutting table to the delivery service, overseeing every aspect of the build of your kilt.

The Kilt Song by Aly Macrae July 23, 2015 23:49

There has long been a debate over how long your kilt should be. Do you wear it above the knee? Do you wear it below the knee? Maybe this will help you when you decide to purchase your Angry Bastard Utility Kilt.

Warning: Every Day Scottish Language Rated: TVMA


Now that we have that settled, click here to see how to measure your kilt.

Festival Season Is Going Full Bore July 23, 2015 12:40

Highland Games are events held in spring and summer in Scotland and other countries as a way of celebrating Scottish and Celtic culture and, especially that of the Scottish Highlands. Certain aspects of the games are so well known as to have become emblematic of Scotland, such as the bagpipes, the kilt, and the heavy events, especially the caber toss. While centered on competitions in piping and drumming, dancing, and Scottish heavy athletics, the games also include entertainment and exhibits related to other aspects of Scottish and Gaelic culture.

Cowal Highland Gathering, better known as the Cowal Games, held in Dunoon, Scotland, every August, is the largest Highland games in the world, attracting around 3,500 competitors and somewhere in the region of 23,000 spectators from around the globe. Worldwide, however, it is exceeded in terms of spectators by two gatherings in the United States: the estimated 30,000 that attend Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina and the even larger gathering—the largest in the Northern Hemisphere—that has taken place every year since 1865 hosted by the Caledonian Club of San Francisco. This event is currently held on Labor Day weekend in Pleasanton, California.

Highland games are events held in spring and summer in Scotland and other countries as a way of celebrating Scottish and Celtic culture and, especially that of the Scottish Highlands. Certain aspects of the games are so well known as to have become emblematic of Scotland, such as the bagpipes, the kilt, and the heavy events, especially the caber toss. While centered on competitions in piping and drumming, dancing, and Scottish heavy athletics, the games also include entertainment and exhibits related to other aspects of Scottish and Gaelic culture.

Cowal Highland Gathering, better known as the Cowal Games, held in Dunoon, Scotland, every August, is the largest Highland games in the world, attracting around 3,500 competitors and somewhere in the region of 23,000 spectators from around the globe. Worldwide, however, it is exceeded in terms of spectators by two gatherings in the United States: the estimated 30,000 that attend Grandfather Mountain in North Carolina and the even larger gathering—the largest in the Northern Hemisphere—that has taken place every year since 1865 hosted by the Caledonian Club of San Francisco. This event is currently held on Labor Day weekend in Pleasanton, California.

The games are claimed to have influenced Baron Pierre de Coubertin when he was planning the revival of the Olympic Games. De Coubertin saw a display of Highland games at the Paris Exhibition of 1889.

In their original form many centuries ago, Highland games revolved around athletic and sports competitions. Though other activities were always a part of the festivities, many today still consider Highland athletics to be what the games are all about—in short, that the athletics are the Games, and all the other activities are just entertainment. Regardless, it remains true today that the athletic competitions are at least an integral part of the events and one—the caber toss—has come to almost symbolize the Highland games.

Although quite a range of events can be a part of the Highland athletics competition, a few have become standard.

  • Caber Toss: A long tapered pine pole or log is stood upright and hoisted by the competitor who balances it vertically holding the smaller end in his hands (see photo). Then the competitor runs forward attempting to toss it in such a way that it turns end over end with the upper (larger) end striking the ground first. The smaller end that was originally held by the athlete then hits the ground in the 12 o'clock position measured relative to the direction of the run. If successful, the athlete is said to have turned the caber. Cabers vary greatly in length, weight, taper, and balance, all of which affect the degree of difficulty in making a successful toss. Competitors are judged on how closely their throws approximate the ideal 12 o'clock toss on an imaginary clock.
  • Stone Put: This event is similar to the modern-day shot put as seen in the Olympic Games. Instead of a steel shot, a large stone of variable weight is often used. There are also some differences from the Olympic shot put in allowable techniques. There are two versions of the stone toss events, differing in allowable technique. The "Braemar Stone" uses a 20–26 lb stone for men (13–18 lb for women) and does not allow any run up to the toe board or "trig" to deliver the stone, i.e., it is a standing put. In the "Open Stone" using a 16–22 lb stone for men (or 8–12 lb for women), the thrower is allowed to use any throwing style so long as the stone is put with one hand with the stone resting cradled in the neck until the moment of release. Most athletes in the open stone event use either the "glide" or the "spin" techniques.
  • Scottish Hammer Throw: This event is similar to the hammer throw as seen in modern-day track and field competitions, though with some differences. In the Scottish event, a round metal ball (weighing 16 or 22 lb for men or 12 or 16 lb for women) is attached to the end of a shaft about 4 feet in length and made out of wood, bamboo, rattan, or plastic. With the feet in a fixed position, the hammer is whirled about one's head and thrown for distance over the shoulder. Hammer throwers sometimes employ specially designed footwear with flat blades to dig into the turf to maintain their balance and resist the centrifugal forces of the implement as it is whirled about the head. This substantially increases the distance attainable in the throw.
  • Weight Throw: also known as the weight for distance event. There are actually two separate events, one using a light (28 lb for men and 14 lb for women) and the other a heavy (56 lb for men, 42 lb for masters men, and 28 lb for women) weight. The weights are made of metal and have a handle attached either directly or by means of a chain. The implement is thrown using one hand only, but otherwise using any technique. Usually a spinning technique is employed. The longest throw wins.
  • Weight over the Bar: also known as weight for height. The athletes attempt to toss a 56-pound (4-stone) weight with an attached handle over a horizontal bar using only one hand. Each athlete is allowed three attempts at each height. Successful clearance of the height allows the athlete to advance into the next round at a greater height. The competition is determined by the highest successful toss with fewest misses being used to break tie scores.
  • Sheaf Toss: A bundle of straw (the sheaf) weighing 20 pounds (9 kg) for the men and 10 pounds (4.5 kg) for the women and wrapped in a burlap bag is tossed vertically with a pitchfork over a raised bar much like that used in pole vaulting. The progression and scoring of this event is similar to the Weight Over The Bar. There is significant debate among athletes as to whether the sheaf toss is in fact an authentic Highland event. Some argue it is actually a country fair event, but all agree that it is a great crowd pleaser.
  • Maide Leisg: (Scots Gaelic meaning 'Lazy Stick'): Trial of strength performed by two men sitting on the ground with the soles of their feet pressing against each other. Thus seated, they held a stick between their hands which they pulled against each other until one of them was raised from the ground. The oldest 'Maide Leisg' competition in the world takes place at the Carloway show and Highland Games on the Isle of Lewis.

Many of the Heavy Events competitors in Scottish highland athletics are former high school and college track and field athletes who find the Scottish games are a good way to continue their competitive careers.

Increasingly in the USA, the Heavy Events are attracting women and master class athletes which has led to a proliferation of additional classes in Heavy Events competitions. Lighter implements are used in the classes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


It LIVES!!! March 23, 2015 14:28

Finally, Angry Bastard Kilts are online and ready to order!  We've been working diligently to bring you a service that makes it easier than ever for you to get your kilt on. 

We're also working to source new materials and create some killer new looks to add to our inventory.  From heavy-duty denims, to faux leathers, to super fine and comfortable Muslin; you will be blown away when you see some of the new styles our designers are working on!

Stay tuned!